Philocalist.
Aristotle once said, "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit." I'm working on forming a habit.

 

And you tried to change, didn’t you? Closed your mouth more. Tried to be softer, prettier, less volatile, less awake… You can’t make homes out of human beings. Someone should have already told you that. And if he wants to leave, then let him leave. You are terrifying, and strange, and beautiful. Something not everyone knows how to love.

Warsan Shire, For Women Who Are Difficult To Love (via goonsac)

(Source: hello-lolo)

nprfreshair:

Bioethicist and internist Dr. Barron Lerner spoke to Fresh Air about his new memoir, The Good Doctor. His father was a doctor in an era before advance medical directives—doctors often made end-of-life decisions without consulting the patient or family. In today’s interview he talks about how bioethics have changed. When his mother had breast cancer his father took control over all of her medical decisions. Lerner explains why that is problematic: 

"I think there’s a consensus these days that it’s a bad idea to treat your family members. There’s all sorts of potential problems there. First thing, you’re not going to be as objective as you otherwise might be. You’ve got an emotional attachment to these folks, and they have an emotional attachment to you. It’s pretty hard to imagine a family member saying no to their relative who is their doctor. Most ethics organizations, or people who have weighed in on this, say that it’s OK to be interested in your family, maybe give them some advice, guide them to other doctors, but to actually be involved in the day-to-day care, you’re probably not going to give them the best care and there’s just an inherent conflict of interest there."

nprfreshair:

Bioethicist and internist Dr. Barron Lerner spoke to Fresh Air about his new memoir, The Good Doctor. His father was a doctor in an era before advance medical directives—doctors often made end-of-life decisions without consulting the patient or family. In today’s interview he talks about how bioethics have changed. When his mother had breast cancer his father took control over all of her medical decisions. Lerner explains why that is problematic: 

"I think there’s a consensus these days that it’s a bad idea to treat your family members. There’s all sorts of potential problems there. First thing, you’re not going to be as objective as you otherwise might be. You’ve got an emotional attachment to these folks, and they have an emotional attachment to you. It’s pretty hard to imagine a family member saying no to their relative who is their doctor. Most ethics organizations, or people who have weighed in on this, say that it’s OK to be interested in your family, maybe give them some advice, guide them to other doctors, but to actually be involved in the day-to-day care, you’re probably not going to give them the best care and there’s just an inherent conflict of interest there."